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Artists of the Promenade des Anglais, Nice

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Norwegian artist Edvard Munch (1863-1944) is best known for his iconic work of anxiety and despair The Scream. But the artists also painted pictures that you'd want to hang on your bedroom wall or have as your screensaver, like his depiction here of Nice's beautiful Promenade des Anglais in 1892.


The famous walk has attracted many artists, the most notable of which was Raoul Dufy who lived for many years in the city. Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec painted the promenade, as did less well known artists like Angelo Garino (1860-1945) in this painting below from 1922. The location is close to the Jardin Albert 1er with its fine esplanade and which once bore the name of le jardin Paradis (Paradise Garden).




German Max Beckmann (1884-1950) was another artist that was attracted to the charm of La Prom. In his work from 1947 called simply Promenade des Anglais in Nizza (Nizza is the Italian name for Nice which was once an Italian possession) we look down from the Colline du Chatêau, or Castle…

Blogging Short Stories #4 - THE LIBRARY CONFERENCE

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“Colleagues, if I could have your attention!”
     It was the occasion of the Annual Library Conference and the librarians were gathered together in the Assembly Room at the main library. Dennis, the Chief Librarian, was standing on the platform addressing the assembly.
     On the platform with Dennis, in a seat around a large occasional table, was a lady in a blue trouser suit with a look of importance on her face.
     Dennis continued.
     “Thank you. We are pleased and honoured to have with us today as our special guest the Minister of Culture, one of whose responsibilities in government is the promotion of public libraries.” He turned to the lady. “Minister, welcome.”
     Applause from the room. The lady nodded her head. Dennis took his place in a seat next to her at the table.
     “Minister, as you know there has been, and indeed there continues to be, much upheaval in public libraries today up and down the country. Many libraries have been forced to close completely, others have …

A World Elsewhere says..... Sundays are for loafing, drinking coffee & reading books !

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loaf
v. [no obj] spend one's time in an aimless, idle way
loafer
n. [mass noun] a person who avoids work and spends their time idly





Blogging Short Stories #3 - THE STRANGE STORY OF PEOPLE WHO SAY THINGS TWICE

‘Let me introduce myself, introduce myself. My name’s Roger, Roger, and I have this strange habit, strange habit, of saying the same thing twice, saying the same thing twice.’
     I was intrigued to know more.
     ‘How did it begin?’ I asked him.
     ‘Well, well,’ Roger said, ‘I’m not sure, I’m not sure. I was quite young at the time, quite young at the time, certainly not old, certainly not old, and I suddenly found myself, suddenly found myself, saying something, saying something, that I’d only just said, only just said.’
     ‘Gosh,’ I said. ‘Did you see anyone about it?’
     ‘I did, I did,’ Roger said. ‘But there was nothing they could do, nothing they could do. Seems they know very little about it, very little about it. They’re carrying out a study, carrying out a study, to try to find the cause, try to find the cause. But until then, until then, I’m afraid we’re in limbo, afraid we’re in limbo.’
     ‘So there’s no treatment for it?’ I asked.
     ‘Not at the moment, not at the mom…

Reminiscences of a Cool Shakespearean

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I was about 18 years old when I bought my first Complete Works. I remember it well, a hardback book with a plain cover; thick, poor quality paper which quickly became tacky; and tiny print with no footnotes. It was absolutely the worst kind of books to begin an exploration of the works of the Bard. But I suppose that I must have persisted for at some point I graduated to individual editions of several of the plays. The Cambridge Shakespeare, with their red covers and a drawing of Shakespeare by Picasso, were my preferred editions, and I remember purchasing Hamlet, As You Like It, Troilus and Cressida, Othello, Richard III, and perhaps several more that I no longer recall. I carried my copy of Hamlet around with me for so long and read it so much that it literally fell to pieces. I particularly liked the prose scenes with their lively, witty, esoteric dialogue, such as Hamlet’s assertion that he was ‘but mad north-north-west. When the wind is southerly, I know a hawk from a handsaw.’ 2…

A World Elsewhere presents..... Gelato italiano / Italian ice cream

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Blogging Short Stories #2 - A MAN OF MYSTERY

His name was Bernard. I knew that much about him. At least I thought I did.      He lived in a flat on the top floor of a low rise block opposite my own. He was about sixty years old, six feet tall and of heavy build. The blinds of his flat were almost always down, but occasionally his kitchen blinds would be up and I could sometimes see him moping about, preparing a meal perhaps, or defrosting the fridge. Sometimes I saw him leaving or returning to his flat. He walked with his arms hanging lankly by his sides and his head lowered to the ground. His walk was slow and methodical, never looking around him or at passers-by, his gaze fixed on the ground in front. He invariably had a haversack on his back and an outdoor coat, with a heavy pair of boots.       I called him ‘a man of mystery‘, and became intrigued, one might even say, obsessed with wanting to know who he was and what he did, particularly as he sometimes disappeared for days at a time. I knew he was away because at night there …